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Stevenson I DD-645 - History

Stevenson I DD-645 - History



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Stevenson I DD-645

Stevenson I(DD-645: dp. 1,630; 1. 348'3; b. 36'1;. dr. 17'5; s. 37.4 k.; cpl. 276, a. 4 5, 4 40mm., 7 20mm., 5 21'tt., 2 act., 6 dcp.; cl. Gleaves)Stevenson (DD-645) was laid down on 23 July 1942 by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Kearny, N.J.; launched on 11 November 1942; sponsored by Miss Mary Stevenson, daughter of Pay Inspector Stevenson; and commissioned on 15 December 1942, Lt. Comdr. Thomas C. Greene in command.Stevenson commenced shakedown in late December immediately after commissioning, but, on 4 February 1943, she collided with SS Berwind Vale off Newport, R.I., losing part of her bow. After repairs at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, she escorted five merchant convoys between the U.S. east coast and North African ports. During that period, March through December 1943, she made several attacks on suspected submarine contacts, but none resulted in a confirmed kill.On 23 January 1944, Stevenson left Norfolk to join the 7th Fleet in the Southwest Pacific. Shortly after arriving, she saw her first action, providing gunfire support for the landings on Los Negros Island in the Admiralties on 29 February 1944. For the next five months, she took part in the leap-frogging assaults along the New Guinea coast, participating in the landings in Humboldt Bay in April, at Wakde in May, and at Sansapor and Noemfoor in July. On 20 August, Stevenson departed New Guinea to join the Palau Islands invasion force. She was employed during the landings as a unit of the transport screen, both en route and at the objective. Upon completion of the Palau operations she sailed on 14 October for Seattle, Wash., for overhaul.Refresher training lasted until 27 January 1945, when she left Pearl Harbor for Ulithi. From February to August 1945, Stevenson escorted the replenishment units of the Logistics Support Group, which supported the fast carrier forces during the Iwo Jima and Okinawa operations and the air strikes on the Japanese homeland. On 5 June, she weathered a typhoon; and, by the end of the war, she was operating within 200 miles of the Japanese coast to support Admiral Halsey's carriers. After brief occupation duty, during which she rode out another typhoon in Japan between 9-11 October, the destroyer sailed for home via Singapore and Capetown. She arrived in Charleston, S.C., on 20 January 1946, where she was decommissioned on 27 April 1946 and placed in reserve. She was struck from the Navy list on 1 June 1968.Stevenson earned seven battle stars for her World War II service.


Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

Stevenson (DD-645) was laid down on 23 July 1942 by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Kearny, N.J. launched on 11 November 1942 sponsored by Miss Mary Stevenson, daughter of Pay Inspector Stevenson and commissioned on 15 December 1942, Lt. Comdr. Thomas C. Greene in command.

Stevenson commenced shakedown in late December immediately after commissioning, but, on 4 February 1943, she collided with SS Berwind Vale off Newport, R.I., losing part of her bow. After repairs at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, she escorted five merchant convoys between the U.S. east coast and North African ports. During that period, March through December 1943, she made several attacks on suspected submarine contacts, but none resulted in a confirmed kill.

On 23 January 1944, Stevenson left Norfolk to join the 7th Fleet in the Southwest Pacific. Shortly after arriving, she saw her first action, providing gunfire support for the landings on Los Negros Island in the Admiralties on 29 February 1944. For the next five months, she took part in the leap-frogging assaults along the New Guinea coast, participating in the landings in Humboldt Bay in April, at Wakde in May, and at Sansapor and Noemfoor in July. On 20 August, Stevenson departed New Guinea to join the Palau Islands invasion force. She was employed during the landings as a unit of the transport screen, both en route and at the objective. Upon completion of the Palau operations she sailed on 14 October for Seattle, Wash., for overhaul.

Refresher training lasted until 27 January 1945, when she left Pearl Harbor for Ulithi. From February to August 1945, Stevenson escorted the replenishment units of the Logistics Support Group, which supported the fast carrier forces during the Iwo Jima and Okinawa operations and the air strikes on the Japanese homeland. On 5 June, she weathered a typhoon and, by the end of the war, she was operating within 200 miles of the Japanese coast to support Admiral Halsey's carriers. After brief occupation duty, during which she rode out another typhoon in Japan between 9-11 October, the destroyer sailed for home via Singapore and Capetown. She arrived in Charleston, S.C., on 20 January 1946, where she was decommissioned on 27 April 1946 and placed in reserve. She was struck from the Navy list on 1 June 1968 [and sold 2 June 1970].

Stevenson earned seven battle stars for her World War II service. Transcribed and formatted for HTML by Patrick Clancey, HyperWar Foundation


USS Stevenson DD-645 (1942-1968)

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Product Description

USS Stevenson DD 645

World War II Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Stevenson cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

Additional Bonus:

  • 22 Minute Audio " American Radio Mobilizes the Homefront " WWII (National Archives)
  • 22 Minute Audio " Allied Turncoats Broadcast for the Axis Powers " WWII (National Archives)
  • 20 Minute Audio of a " 1967 Equator Crossing " (Not this ship but the Ceremony is Traditional)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.
      • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
      • Self contained CD no software to load.
      • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
      • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
      • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
      • Viewing options are described in the help section.
      • Bookmark your favorite pages.
      • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
      • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
      • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

      Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

      The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

      If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

      We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.


      Stevenson I DD-645 - History

      Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

      This CD will Exceed your Expectations

      A great part of naval history.

      You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Stevenson DD 645 cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

      This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

      Some of the items in this book are as follows:

      • Launching and Commissioning the Ship
      • Atlantic - Casablanca , Gibraltar
      • New Guinea and South America
      • Panama , Galapagos and Bora Bora
      • West Pacific - Iwo Jima and Okinawa Japan
      • Sagami Wan, Tokyo Bay , Wakanura Wan and Singapore
      • Colombo Ceylon
      • Crossing the Line (Equator)
      • Cape town
      • Log of the Stevenson by Date 12/29/43 - 12/6/45
      • Divisional Profiles of many if not all sailors
      • Muster Roll (Name, Rank, Date Reported and Date Transferred)

      Over 420 Photos on 117 Pages

      Once you view this CD you will have a better idea of what life was like on this Destroyer during World War II.


      Contents

      John H. Stevenson was a native of New York City. He was appointed Volunteer Acting Assistant Paymaster and Clerk in the United States Navy on 19 September 1862 during the American Civil War.

      While attached to USS Satellite on the Potomac in December 1862, he led a boat expedition ashore, captured a small party of Confederates, and destroyed signal and recruiting stations. In June 1863, while attached to USS Princess Royal on the West Gulf Blockading Squadron, he reconnoitered in and about an enemy camp. Learning the details of a plan to capture Fort Donaldsonville, Louisiana, he made plans that enabled the small fort and Princess Royal to beat off the attack. On 10 July 1863 when he volunteered to pick up dispatches from USS New London, aground under enemy fire, and carried them to David Farragut at New Orleans, a journey of some 85 miles (137 km) on horseback through enemy territory. He remained in the Navy after the war, serving in United States ports, the South Atlantic and Pacific stations, and at Nagasaki, Japan, until retiring with the grade of Pay Inspector on 25 September 1893. He was called back to active duty during the Spanish–American War and served as pay officer of the Coast Defense System. He died in Brooklyn, New York, on 14 June 1899.

      The name Stevenson was assigned on 22 January 1941 to DD-503, an experimental 900-ton destroyer ordered on 9 September 1940 from the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Kearny, N.J. However, the contract was cancelled on 10 February 1941 and replaced by a contract for the Gleaves class destroyer.


      Stevenson I DD-645 - History

      A Tin Can Sailors
      Destroyer History

      The new year found her north of the Gilberts, at Funafuti, where the carrier forces were preparing for operation “Flintlock” against the Marshall Islands. From 23 January to 5 February 1944, the CHARRETTE was with Task Group 58.3, screening the carriers BUNKER HILL (CV-17), MONTEREY (CV-26), and COWPENS (CVL-25) in a series of strikes on Kwajalein and Eniwetok. Also with the task group were the HUNT (DD-674), IZARD (DD-589), CONNER (DD-582), BELL (DD-587), BURNS (DD-588), BRADFORD (DD-545), BROWN (DD-546), COWELL (DD-547), and WILSON (DD-408).

      At 2203 on the night of 4 February, the CHARRETTE left her screening station to investigate a radar contact reported by the battleship NEW JERSEY. By 0003, she’d located her target and at 3,200 yards, launched depth charges. The submarine dove and the destroyer lost contact, but her captain reported his certainty that they had damaged the elusive boat. For the continued search, the destroyer escort FAIR (DE-35) joined the CHARRETTE, which used her radar to coach the DE into a position to launch a hedgehog attack. At 0040 the FAIR made her attack, achieving four detonations, which were followed by several thunderous explosions. The two U.S. ships had sunk the I󈚹, one of the submarines in the attack on Pearl Harbor and the probable culprit in the sinking of the destroyer PORTER at Santa Cruz.

      A week later, the CHARRETTE sailed with the carriers for the first of the series of massive air raids that ended the usefulness of the Japanese stronghold at Truk. She subsequently joined TG 50.9, which included the battleships NEW JERSEY (BB-62) and IOWA (BB-61), the cruisers MINNEAPOLIS (CA-36) and NEW ORLEANS (CL/CA-32), and the destroyers IZARD, BRADFORD, and BURNS. On 17 February, they made a sweep around the island of Truk to catch Japanese shipping fleeing the air attacks on their base. In addition to a freighter, they sent the cruiser KATORI, destroyer MAIKAZE, and the submarine chaser SC-24 to the bottom. Their work done, TG 50.9 rejoined the carriers the next day.

      The CHARRETTE saw action again on 15 March as carrier planes attacked enemy ships at Palau, continuing into Japanese‑held waters. She and her task group fought off an enemy air attack on the 28 th , and kept up their vigil through the strikes of 30 March and 1 April. With the carrier force, she moved on to strike airfields and defenses on New Guinea, to support the landings at Humboldt Bay on 22 April, to hit Truk on 29 April, and guard the battleships as they bombarded Ponape 1 May.

      The CHARRETTE's next contribution came during the Marianas campaign, for which

      she sailed 6 June 1944. She supported the carriers in their strikes on Guam, Saipan, and Rota from 11 through 14 June, then turned north for strikes against enemy aircraft massed on Iwo Jima for attacks against the American landings on Saipan. As the carriers came into position on 15 June, scouting aircraft spotted a 1,900‑ton freighter, the TAGAWA MARU. Around noon, the CHARRETTE and task-group flagship BOYD (DD�) shelled the enemy ship, sinking it in less than seven minutes. The CHARRETTE recovered 112 survivors.

      From Saipan, her group turned south to meet a Japanese naval force racing toward the Marianas. During the ensuing Battle of the Philippine Sea, the CHARRETTE continued her screening, antiaircraft, and plane guard duties. On the night of 20 June, she participated in the recovery of aviators forced to ditch when their fuel ran out on their return from their last strikes. The next day, the carrier force covered the invasion forces in the Marianas, hurling strike after strike at Guam, Rota, the Pagan Islands, and Chichi Jima. The CHARRETTE shelled Chichi Jima on 6 August, and then returned to Eniwetok.

      She was back with the carriers for the air strikes in early September against targets in the Palaus and the Philippines and, on 4 October, for strikes against Japanese airfields on Okinawa, Northern Luzon, and Formosa. On 12 October strikes against Formosa provoked return attacks on the carriers by Japanese aircraft. The CHARRETTE aided in splashing attackers and driving off the raids during which the cruisers CANBERRA (CA󈛪) and HOUSTON (CL󈛵) were hit. She helped escort the ships out of the area, then returned to her carrier group, racing to intercept an approaching enemy force. The confrontation resulted in the epic Battle for Leyte Gulf which put an end to the Japanese Navy as an effective fighting force.

      On 26 October 1944, she screened the carriers as their aircraft struck the enemy’s northern force off Cape Engano, sinking four Japanese carriers and a destroyer. By early November, she was with the fast carriers during air strikes against Luzon airfields and from 4 to 18 January 1945, screened the group supporting the landings in the Lingayen Gulf. Following six months for an overhaul at the Puget Sound Navy Yard, the CHARRETTE was back in action in June covering minesweepers and underwater demolition teams clearing the way through Brunei Bay for the invading Allied forces. She was flagship for the covering group that consisted of the CONNER, BELL, BURNS, KILLEN (DD-593), ALBERT W. GRANT (DD-649), and HMAS ARUNTA. The landings at Balikpapan were next on her schedule. For this operation, she went in with eight cruisers and the destroyers CONWAY (DD-507), EATON (DD-510), STEVENSON (DD-645), CONY (DD-508), ARUNTA, HART (DD-594), METCALF (DD-595), KILLEN, ALBERT W. GRANT, BELL, CONNER, and BURNS. They bombarded enemy installations, moving in close to silence their shore batteries and putting an end to the threat they had posed to ships and troops involved in the invasion.

      Early on the morning of 2 August 1945, the CHARRETTE’s and CONNER’s radar picked up a ship, which they discovered was the hospital ship TACHIBANA MARU. A search party from CHARRETTE found ordnance and other contraband as well as able‑bodied troops, who they took prisoner. The destroyers escorted their prize to Morotai on 6 August and turned it over to the authorities.

      From The Tin Can Sailor, January 2005


      Copyright 2001 Tin Can Sailors.
      All rights reserved.
      This article may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from
      Tin Can Sailors.


      Stevenson I DD-645 - History

      Nineteen forty-three was a year of unheralded operations for the squadron. In January, Gillespie and Kalk deployed to the Aleutians Islands, where Gillespie screened cruisers Indianapolis and Richmond in bombarding Attu Island. In March, the two ships returned to San Francisco and in April went to the Atlantic. There they joined Hobby, which in February had begun escorting convoys between New York and Casablanca and later to the Mediterranean, earning the squadron&rsquos only service star of the year. The four destroyers of DesDiv 23 also escorted convoys in the Atlantic throughout 1943. Last-commissioned Welles arrived from the Pacific in November.

      World War II operations of destroyers
      originally attached to Squadron 19

      In contrast, 1944 began with a bang. On 3 January, Thorn and Turner were anchored near the Ambrose Lightship at the entrance to New York&rsquos main shipping channel when Turner sustained a series of explosions of unknown origin and was lost.

      Later that month, the remainder of the squadron departed for the Pacific. There, in March, it was attached to the Seventh Fleet for General MacArthur&rsquos seizure of the Admiralty Islands, which concluded the Bismarck Archipelago operation, and continued west with Squadron 21, Squadron 24 and a reconstituted Destroyer Division 24 in support of his jungle campaign along New Guinea&rsquos north coast.

      On 10 April, Thorn struck an uncharted reef at Hollandia. After repairs on the West Coast, she rejoined the squadron and, when it went home, continued operating in the Philippines. She was present at the Battle of Surigao Strait.

      On 12 June off Biak, Kalk sustained a bomb hit and also went to the West Coast for repairs. She then returned to operate from Ulithi in screening assignments and anti-submarine patrols.

      In September, the squadron, still without Thorn, screened transports during the invasion of Palau. Afterward, Gillespie, Stevenson and Stockton took their turns for West Coast overhaul and thus missed operating in the Philippines between October and January 1945.

      They returned to bring the squadron back to full strength for the assault on Iwo Jima in February. There, on the 21st, Stockton was in a formation attacked by four suicide planes, which sank escort carrier Bismarck Sea (CVE 95) and damaged Lunga Point (CVE 94).

      For the Okinawa operation that followed, the squadron operated with replenishment units of the Logistics Support Groups. On 31 March, Stockton and Morrison (DD 560) sank Japanese submarine I-8.

      In the spring of 1944, Buchanan had been reassigned from a reorganized DesRon 12 to restore DesDiv 23 to four ships. Closing Japan in August, however, she rejoined DesRon 12&rsquos Lansdowne and Lardner in escorting battleship South Dakota into Tokyo Bay on the 28th. She also transported General MacArthur&rsquos party to battleship Missouri for the surrender ceremony on 2 September.

      In June, meanwhile, Hobby and Welles had gone to the West Coast for their long-awaited overhauls. They where there when war ended.

      After the surrender, Gillespie, Kalk, Stevenson, Stockton and Thorn remained in the western Pacific for occupation duty before sailing for home&mdashthe first two to the East Coast via San Diego the latter three via the Cape of Good Hope (see photo at the top of this page of Stevenson, Stockton and Thorn in company with Lansdowne, Lardner and Nelson)&mdasharriving in December.

      Source: Destroyer History Foundation database and Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships entries for individual ships.


      Teófilo Stevenson, Cuban Boxing Great, Dies at 60

      Teófilo Stevenson, one of the greatest amateurs in boxing history, the winner of three Olympic gold medals for Cuba and a national hero who shunned the prospect of turning pro, possibly fighting Muhammad Ali and becoming rich in the United States, died on Monday in Havana. He was 60.

      The cause was a heart attack, the government-run Radio Havana Cuba said.

      Stevenson was a formidable heavyweight fighter, standing 6 feet 5 inches, weighing 220 pounds and wielding a powerful right hand. In the 1970s and early ’80s, when Cuba emerged as a power in international boxing, he dominated worldwide amateur boxing in its most prestigious division, winning three world amateur championships.

      Stevenson won the heavyweight title at the 1972 Games in Munich, the 1976 Games in Montreal and the 1980 Games in Moscow, which were boycotted by the United States to protest the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. He became the first Olympic boxer to capture three gold medals in the same division. He won the last of his three world titles, at Reno, Nev., in 1986, when he was 34.

      American boxing promoters could have profited hugely from a cold war-era matchup pitting Stevenson, the product of a Communist sports system, against Ali. There were reports that Stevenson was offered millions to fight in the United States. But the Castro government banned Cuban athletes from competing professionally, so he would have had to defect to take on Ali.

      “No, I will not leave my country for one million dollars or for much more than that,” Stevenson was quoted as saying by Sports Illustrated in 1974 in an article headlined “He’d Rather Be Red Than Rich.”

      “What is a million dollars,” he added, “against eight million Cubans who love me?”

      Teófilo Stevenson was born on March 29, 1952, one of five children. Some news media reports said he was a native of Jamaica, but he said in a 2003 interview with The Chicago Tribune in Havana that he was born in the Cuban town of Puerto Padre. He grew up in Cuba and began boxing as a teenager at a gym where his father, who loaded sugar onto ships, sparred recreationally.

      He became a Cuban junior champion, then began his long international reign when he won Olympic gold at Munich, fighting out of an upright style with an effective jab and his right hand cocked, waiting for an opening.

      In the Munich quarterfinals Stevenson scored a technical knockout over Duane Bobick of the United States, who had beaten him at the 1971 Pan American Games. Bobick became a leading pro heavyweight. In the semifinals at Montreal, Stevenson knocked out John Tate, a future World Boxing Association heavyweight champion.

      He scored knockouts or technical knockouts in nine of his Olympic bouts, won two others by a three-round decision and won the final in 1972 when his Romanian opponent defaulted because of an injury.

      In 1980, Stevenson joined Laszlo Papp of Hungary as the second boxer to win gold at three separate Olympic Games. (Papp won as a middleweight and light middleweight in the 1940s and ’50s.) Felix Savon of Cuba, who idolized Stevenson while a young boxer, won three Olympic heavyweight titles from 1992 to 2000. Stevenson might have won a fourth Olympic gold if Cuba had not boycotted the 1984 Games in Los Angeles.

      Stevenson retired in 1987. He had 301 victories in 321 bouts over a 20-year career, according to Radio Havana Cuba. He was later vice president of Cuba’s boxing federation and its national sports institute and lived in a suburb of Havana. His survivors include two children.

      In October 1999, Stevenson, who was coaching a Cuban boxing team, was arrested at Miami International Airport while returning home after he had head-butted a ticket agent, the police said. He was released on bail and did not return to Miami for a hearing. Back in Cuba, he told a newspaper that he had accidentally butted the agent after dropping his ticket during a heated exchange in which the agent insulted Fidel Castro.

      Stevenson, whose boxing career was subsidized by the Cuban government, remained loyal to Castro, but his motivation in deciding against turning pro in the United States by defecting may have been more nuanced than he let on at the time.

      “I didn’t need the money because it was going to mess up my life,” he told The Tribune in 2003. “For professional boxers, the money is a trap. You make a lot of money, but how many boxers in history do we know that died poor? The money always goes into other people’s hands.”


      USS Stevenson (DD-645)

      USS Stevenson (DD-645), a Gleaves-class destroyer, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be assigned that name. The first vessel, Stevenson (DD-503), was cancelled during construction and never completed. Both ships are named for John H. Stevenson.

      Stevenson was laid down on 23 July 1942 by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Kearny, New Jersey, launched on 11 November 1942, sponsored by Miss Mary Stevenson, daughter of Pay Inspector Stevenson, and commissioned on 15 December 1942, Lieutenant Commander Thomas C. Greene in command.

      Stevenson commenced shakedown in late December immediately after commissioning, but, on 4 February 1943, she collided with SS Berwind Vale off Newport, Rhode Island, losing part of her bow. After repairs at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, she escorted five merchant convoys between the U.S. east coast and North African ports. During that period, March through December 1943, she made several attacks on suspected submarine contacts, but none resulted in a confirmed kill.

      On 23 January 1944, Stevenson left Norfolk to join the U.S. 7th Fleet in the Southwest Pacific. Shortly after arriving, she saw her first action, providing gunfire support for the landings on Los Negros Island in the Admiralties on 29 February 1944. For the next five months she took part in the leap-frogging assaults along the New Guinea coast, participating in the landings in Humboldt Bay in April, at Wakde in May, and at Sansapor and Noemfoor in July. On 20 August, Stevenson departed New Guinea to join the Palau Islands invasion force. She was employed during the landings as a unit of the transport screen, both en route and at the objective. Upon completion of the Palau operations, she sailed on 14 October for Seattle, Washington, for overhaul.

      Refresher training lasted until 27 January 1945, when she left Pearl Harbor for Ulithi. From February to August 1945, Stevenson escorted the replenishment units of the Logistics Support Group, which supported the fast carrier forces during the Iwo Jima and Okinawa operations and the air strikes on the Japanese homeland. On 5 June, she weathered a typhoon by the end of the war, she was operating within 200 miles (370 km) of the Japanese coast to support Admiral William F. Halsey's carriers. After brief occupation duty, during which she rode out Typhoon Louise in Japan between 9–11 October, the destroyer sailed for home via Singapore and Cape Town. She arrived in Charleston, South Carolina, on 20 January 1946, where she was decommissioned on 27 April 1946 and placed in reserve. She was struck from the Navy list on 1 June 1968.

      Stevenson earned seven battle stars for her World War II service.


      Watch the video: Stevenson Football ALS Challenge 2014 (August 2022).

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