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Catamount LSD-17 - History

Catamount LSD-17 - History


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Catamount
In 1765 at the Catamount Tavern in Bennington, VT., the colonies of New York and New Hampshire settled their claims for the territory which is now the State of Vermont.
(LSD-17:dp. 4,490; l.457’9”; b.72’2”;dr. 18”; s.15k.; cpl. 326; a 1 5”; cl Casa Grande)
Catamount (LSD-17) was launched 27 January 1945 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Newport News, VA; sponsored by Mrs. D.E. Satterfield, Jr.commissioned 9 April 1945, Commander C. A. Swafford in command; and reported to the Pacific Fleet.

Catamount sailed out of Pearl Harbor 16 June 1945 laden with landing craft for Guam and Eniwetok. Through the remainder of the war, she ferried landing craft, dredges, and other equipment from Espiritu Santo to Kwajalein, Guam, and the Philippines. On 19 August she cleared Guam with special equipment to be used in the occupation of Japan, and on 26 August she stood up Tokyo Bay. Here she operated a boat pool and tended landing craft until 6 October, when she cleared on the first of two voyages to Manila to ferry troops and boats for the Japanese occupation. After a final voyage from Guam to Samar, Catamount cleared for San Francisco and Norfolk, where she arrived 11 February 1946. Joining the Atlantic Fleet, Catamount took part in amphibious training and midshipman cruises until the outbreak of the Korean Conflict.
Leaving Norfolk 15 August 1950, Catamount called at San Diego en route Kobe where she embarked marines bound for the magnificently planned and executed invasion of Inchon. In the landings at Wonsan, Catamount sailed with the important repair and salvage group. It was in November 1950, at Chinnampo, port city of Paengnyong, that Catamount achieved a notable first, when she became the first LSD to take part in minesweeping operations. It was essential that this port be opened so that the advancing Army ashore could be supplied by sea' and all types of minesweepers were summoned for the urgent task. Catamount served as tanker and supply ship to this varied fleet, as well as mothering a swarm of LCVP's which were able to sweep waters too shallow for larger craft.

In December, Catamount took part in the skillful withdrawal of marines and soldiers from Hungnam to Pusan, then returned to Yokosuka to replenish. She returned to tend landing craft at Korean ports through April 1951, when she began duty transporting equipment and supplies from Sasebo to Inchon and Pusan. On 31 May, she cleared Yokosuka for an overhaul at San Diego.

Catamount had two more tours of duty in the Korean War, from 3 November 1951 to 24 July 1952, and from 29 October 1952 to 8 April 1953. She made her first post-war tour from 5 August 1953 to 18 April 1954 During each of these tours' she tended small craft, and transported personnel, as well as taking part in exercises off Japan and Okinawa from her base at San Diego, she conducted local operations, and in the summer of 1954, made two voyages to Naknek, Alaska, with landing craft and oil barges.

On 3 January 1955, Catamount cleared for the Far East once again, arriving at Yokosuka 25 January. Almost at once she sailed for the Taiwan Straits to take part in the evacuation of the Tachen Islands early in February. She returned to San Diego 24 April. After local operations, she spent 16 January to 30 August 1956 in the central Pacific in Operation "Redwing," a nuclear test. In the summer of 1957, Catamount sailed from Seattle, Wash., on resupply missions to stations of the Distant Early Warning Line in the Arctic.from 12 June to 8 December 1958, she cruised in the Far East once more, returning for duty off the coast of southern California. Among her assignments was qualifying helicopter pilots in landings on ships of her type, and participating in amphibious landing exercises based on the relatively new concept of vertical envelopment. Special operations off the northwest coast of the United States and British Columbia in the spring and summer of 1959 preceded a deployment to Hawaii for amphibious training. Later in the year she was overhauled in Portland, Oreg., returning to operations from San Diego 25 March l960. After a brief period of operations and supplementary overhaul in San Diego, Catamount sailed on 26 June on a special mission, carrying landing craft to southern Chile, devastated by earthquakes. Transferred to the Chilean Navy, these landing craft provided critically needed transportation in regions where piers had been destroyed by tidal waves. Catamount returned to San Diego on 13 August, operated on the west coast and on 22 November sailed for another tour with the 7th Fleet in the Far East.

Catamount received seven battle stars for Korean War service.


Catamount LSD-17 - History

From: Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

In 1765, at the Catamount Tavern in Bennington, Vt., the colonies of New York and New Hampshire settled their claims for the territory which is now the State of Vermont. LSD - 17: dp. 4,490 l. 457'9" b.72'2"

dr. 18' s. 15 k. cpl. 326 a. 1 x 5"

Catamount (LSD-17) was launched 27 January 1945 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Va. sponsored by Mrs. D. E. Satterfield, Jr.commissioned 9 April 1945, Commander C. A. Swafford in command and reported to the Pacific Fleet.

Catamount sailed out of Pearl Harbor 16 June 1945 laden with landing craft for Guam and Eniwetok. Through the remainder of the war, she ferried landing craft, dredges, and other equipment from Espiritu Santo to Kwajalein, Guam, and the Philippines. On 19 August she cleared Guam with special equipment to be used in the occupation of Japan, and on 26 August she stood up Tokyo Bay. Here she operated a boat pool and tended landing craft until 6 October, when she cleared on the first of two voyages to Manila to ferry troops and boats for the Japanege occupation. After a final voyage from Guam to Samar, Catamount cleared for San Francisco and Norfolk, where she arrived 11 February 1946. Joining the Atlantic Fleet, Catamount took part in amphibious training and midshipman cruises until the outbreak of the Korean Conflict.

Leaving Norfolk 15 August 1950, Catamount called at San Diego en route Kobe where she embarked marines bound for the magnificently planned and executed invasion of Inchon. In the landings at Wonsan, Catamount sailed with the important repair and salvage group. It was in November 1950, at Chinnampo, port city of Pyongyang, that Catamount achieved a notable first, when she became the first LSD to take part in minesweeping operations. It was essential that this port be opened so that the advancing Army ashore could be supplied by sea, and all types of minesweepers were summoned for the urgent task. Catamount served as tanker and supply ship to this varied fleet, as well as mothering a swarm of LCVP's which were able to sweep waters too shallow for larger craft.

In December, Catamount took part in the skillful withdrawal of marines and soldiers from Hungnam to Pusan, then returned to Yokosuka to replenish. She returned to tend landing craft at Korean ports through April 1951, when she began duty transporting equipment and supplies from Sasebo to Inchon and Pusan. On 31 May, she cleared Yokosuka for an overhaul at San Diego.

Catamount had two more tours of duty in the Korean War, from 3 November 1951 to 24 July 1962 󞩐?], and from 29 October 1952 to 8 April 1953. She made her first post-war tour from 5 August 1953 to 18 April 1954. During each of these tours, she tended small craft, and transported personnel, as well as taking part in exercises off Japan and Okinawa. From her base at San Diego, she conducted local operations, and in the summer of 1954, made two voyages to Naknek, Alaska, with landing craft and oil barges.

On 3 January 1955, Catamount cleared for the Far East once again, arriving at Yokosuka 25 January. Almost at once she sailed for the Taiwan Straits to take part in the evacuation of the Tachen Islands early in February. She returned to San Diego 24 April. After local operations, she spent 16 January to 30 August 1956 in the central Pacific, in Operation "Redwing," a nuclear test. In the summer of 1957, Catamount sailed from Seattle, Wash., on resupply missions to stations of the Distant Early Warning Line in the Arctic. From 12 June to 8 December 1958, she cruised in the Far East once more, returning for duty off the coast of southern California. Among her assignments was qualifying helicopter pilots in landings on ships of her type, and participating in amphibious landing exercises based on the relatively new concept of vertical envelopment. Special operations off the northwest coast of the United States and British Columbia in the spring and summer of 1959 preceded a deployment to Hawaii for amphibious training. Later in the year she was overhauled in Portland, Oreg., returning to operations from San Diego 25 March 1960. After a brief period of operations and supplementary overhaul in San Diego, Catamount sailed on 25 June on a special mission, carrying landing craft to southern Chile, devastated by earthquakes. Transferred to the Chilean Navy, these landing craft provided critically needed transportation in regions where piers had been destroyed by tidal waves. Catamount returned to San Diego on 13 August, operated on the west coast and on 22 November sailed for another tour with the 7th Fleet in the Far East.


22 thoughts on &ldquo Transferring with the USS Catamount (LSD-17) during rough seas during Operation Backpack, March 1964 &rdquo

That ship we were transferring with was the USS Catamount LSD-17. Not sure if it was fuel we were transferring, because she was not a tanker. May have been a practice drill.

Thanks Wasey! I really appreciate the information on the CATAMOUNT, and the correction on the transfer. Making the corrections and additional information available to the original post now.

I was on the Calvert as a 19 year old Marine in early 64 during Operation Backpack. I used to have pictures that looked just like these. I remember refueling in rough seas but I thought it was a tanker or maybe Oiler is proper, Not an LSD. I have great memories of the Calvert. We were in very high seas and to this day I always tell friends that I know what it’s like to look up and the ocean. I never felt in danger and in the end we were fine. I went from Japan to Taiwan on the Calvert and returned on the LSD Fort Marion in calm seas.

A search turned up the following information on Operation Backpack:

Wikipedia: Operation “Backpack,” was a joint American-Taiwanese practice amphibious assault which took place at Che Cheng, Taiwan, in the late-February (1964) to early-March (1964) timeframe.

Beatrice Daily Sun (March 11, 1964): Operation Backpack was a coordinated U.S. – Nationalist Chinese amphibious exercise conducted off the coast of Taiwan. Backpack was an exercise to test the amphibious capabilities and readiness of the forces of the Seventh Fleet and the Nationalist Chinese Navy. Prior to the assault, aircraft of the Seventh Fleet “softened” the beach defense. In addition, support ships conducted anti-submarine warfare exercises and the area surrounding the beachhead was cleared of obstructions and mines. “Backpack” was similar to exercises conducted periodically of the Seventh Fleet with SEATO and other allied nations in the Far East to improve proficiency in coordinated amphibious warfare operations and to maintain working relationships with allied nations.

That is essentially the way I remember it. I went to Taiwan on the Calvert and returned on the
LSD Fort Marion (LSD 22 I think) to Japan. Of the four ships I was on during my tour I remember the Calvert as being the most historic because of all the campaigns it had taken part in during WWII and Korea.

I got on the Calvert in San Diego and climbed down the cargo nets in Okinawa, 28 days later mid 1965.

I was on the Fort Marion during Operation Backpack. Had to drive a 2 1/2 ton truck off and onto a landing craft. Turned the truck around ON the landing craft. Took about 45b minutes.

We may have been on the Fort Marion together. I was part of a gaurd company at Ping Tung South Airbase in 64 and we were the last Marines out of Tiawan because things still needed to be guarded during the breakdown. The last few nights we slept under the stars in sleeping bags because even the tents were gone. There were only a handful on Marines on the Fort Marion which must have been one of the last ships to leave for Yokusuka. We didn’t have any duty on the ship and I remember a trio of sailors who played guitar and sang at night on deck. They were very good and we enjoyed listening to them.

Sorry, I know this site is about the Calvert but it kind of runs together. By the way for all you sailors who always reminded us Marines that we were just a small part of the Navy I’d like to say thanks. I am so proud to have been part of the greatest navy ever to sail the high seas. Sailors and Marines were and we remain a great team.

In Marines on Catamount Japan to San Diego 1Q-1963, 35 days

I was on the USS Catamount during this time period and was a QM. I was assigned to the helm during these drills. I served aboard during 1962-1965.

Charles Roberts, You and I served as Quartermasters aboard the USS Catamount .

Mr. Roberta – did you know a Patrick Ryan, he was also on this ship during the same time period. Am working with him in filing a va claim.

I got aboard the Calvert in San Diego in July of 1965 and climbed down the cargo nets in Okinawa in August.

Hi John, thank you for your comment. Were you in the Marines? Which unit? Regards, Chris – http://www.usscalvert.com

First Marine Division first Service Battalion Electric Maintance Section.

Gary Rolph was aboard the Cat from March 62 to jan 65 a good time was had by all BENO.

I was stationed aboard the USS Calvert APA 32, Feb. 1965 in the BC Division. When we returned from Vietnam in late 65 I was transfferred to the USS Catamount LSD 17 because they needed a coxswain on board. P.E. Foott BM3

i served on the Catamount 66-69 as a ET, I do remember the rough seas. Also have photos of the rough seas.


USS Catamount (LSD-17)

USS Catamount (LSD-17) was a Casa Grande-class dock landing ship of the United States Navy, named in honor of the Catamount Tavern in Old Bennington, which served as headquarters for Ethan Allen's Green Mountain Boys while making their plans against the New Yorkers and the British. The Catamount was also the meeting place of Vermont's only form of government then: the Vermont Council of Safety. [1]

Catamount sailed out of Pearl Harbor on 16 June 1945 laden with landing craft for Guam and Eniwetok. Through the remainder of the war, she ferried landing craft, dredges, and other equipment from Espiritu Santo to Kwajalein, Guam, and the Philippines. On 19 August she cleared Guam with special equipment to be used in the occupation of Japan, and on 26 August she stood up Tokyo Bay. Here she operated a boat pool and tended landing craft until 6 October, when she cleared on the first of two voyages to Manila to ferry troops and boats for the Japanese occupation. After a final voyage from Guam to Samar, Catamount cleared for San Francisco and Norfolk, where she arrived 11 February 1946. Joining the Atlantic Fleet, Catamount took part in amphibious training and midshipman cruises until the outbreak of the Korean War.


History

Catamount Arts was founded in 1975 with a mission of enhancing the cultural and economic climate of northern Vermont and New Hampshire. Integration of the arts into community life has been our guiding principle and we attempt to cultivate awareness and appreciation of the arts through a diversified schedule of film, music, theater, dance, and the visual arts.

For 20 years, Catamount Arts was located literally next door to one of the most beautiful and historically important buildings in the Northeast Kingdom. When it was opened in 1912, the Masonic Temple of St. Johnsbury was the largest and grandest Masonic building the state with more than 700 members. In the generous gesture intended to benefit the entire community, the Masonic Lodge gave this showplace building to Catamount in 2005, in return of a no-cost lease in perpetuity of the top floor, which continues to be used as the Lodge meeting place.

Catamount Arts then embarked on a major construction project to transform the lower two floors into a Community Arts Center. The rehabilitation was designed with the help and encouragement of the local community. Not only were the actual plans developed after a series of public creative forums, but much of the rehabilitation work was done by the St. Johnsbury Academy Building Trades and Electricity Programs and the St. Johnsbury Work Camp participants.
Catamount’s role as the Northeast Kingdom’s primary source of arts and culture vastly expanded with the ribbon cutting on October 4, 2008. The new Community Arts Center features two movie theaters, allowing Catamount Arts to present a regular schedule of acclaimed foreign-language and independent films two state-of-the-art classrooms, which are used for art, computer and music education an 80-seat performance space dedicated to regular performances by local artists and a gallery showcasing local and area artists’ work.

Today, Catamount annual presents an extensive series of performances in the Arts center and at venues throughout Northern Vermont and New Hampshire bringing in nationally known touring artists as well as accomplished local performers. Serving as the Regional Arts Organization for the area, one of Catamount’s key objectives is to assist local performers and arts organizations expand their administrative, marketing and promotional capacity.

Catamount operates a Regional Box Office, which offers online ticketing services (www.catamounTIX.com) twenty-four hours per day and in-person/phone customer service seven days per week. Catamount partners with over forty (40) outstanding arts organization to bring world-class performances throughout the region, open eyes to different cultures, boost the local economy and serve as the heart-beat of our community.

Additionally, each year Catamount produces a huge number of marquee events including the Tap Into Film 48hr Student Film Slam, Circus Smirkus St. Johnsbury, Levitt AMP St. Johnsbury Music Series, St. Johnsbury Bluegrass Festival, KCP Presents Performing Arts Series and First Night North St. Johnsbury.

Catamount’s arts education programs reach all the schools throughout the region with a combination of in/after school classes, options at the Arts Center and school-time performances in larger venues that students get bussed to. Catamount runs a substance-free teen Open Mic on Friday nights to provide at-risk youth a creative outlet and alternative in their community and EPIC Music, an El Sistema inspired string program from Venezuela that is designed to lift children out of poverty through intensive violin training and ensemble opportunities. Catamount works with Northern Vermont University and always has a large team of interns who are gaining on-the-job experience working within the organization. Catamount literally engages thousands upon thousands of students each year with creative opportunities.

In the past five years, Catamount’s visual arts program have become one of the most respected in all of New England. The Fried Family Gallery exhibits works from artists across the country and regularly draws an audience from all around New England.

Catamount’s production team assists organizations across the region to present their own events. Utilizing the Stageline SL100 mobile stage and a full audio and lighting system, the team works with local communities to produce events that celebrate their own unique qualities. This place-making tool will be a valuable tool as the region tries to differentiate itself in the future in an ever-intensifying destination-driven economy.

In addition to these productions, educational opportunities, and services for arts and culture organizations, Catamount Arts has stepped forward to lead the creative sector in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont. Catamount Arts is the designated NEK Creative Zone Agent for the Vermont Creative Network, which was established by the Vermont Legislature in May 2016 as a broad collective of organizations, businesses, and individuals—all sharing a goal to advance Vermont’s creative sector and creative economy.

In 2018, Catamount took a leadership role in both the NEK Collaborative’s Tri-Sector Taskforce (read the report here: https://www.nekcollaborative.org/about/priorities/), and the Vermont Creative Network’s Creative Sector Study (read the report here: http://vermontcreativenetwork.org/). The results of both of these initiatives create a strong foundation of support for Catamount’s strategic plan—both identified the creation of community hubs as a high priority initiative for the region, understanding that the advancement of the arts and culture in our small towns and villages has a major positive impact on the vitality (social, economic, etc.) of our rural communities.

In 2019, based on the recommendations made in the above initiatives, Catamount Arts has launched the Creative Sector Hub Development project in order to build vibrant and place-based creative hubs throughout the region. Working with area partners in communities throughout the Northern Vermont and New Hampshire, the team will develop and implement plans to enhance the unique creative assets in each, thereby advancing the arts sector in each of the rural towns and villages targeted, with ancillary benefits to the wider regional creative economy. The implementation of these plans could produce results that, for example: tie together arts and recreational assets in East Burke boost attendance and community engagement with the Wednesdays on the Waterfront concert series in Newport create joint marketing and promotion initiatives for museums and other cultural assets in Glover and more. Each hub will produce a culminating event or performance to both celebrate and demonstrate the work they have completed, and to build residents’ long-term engagement with their community’s creative sector. The culminating events will both showcase the extraordinary talent of the local artists and artisans in their midst and feature nationally-recognized performers to act as a draw for wider community engagement.

In conclusion, Catamount is deeply woven into the social, esoteric and economic fabric of our local community and is uniquely positioned to have a positive impact on the health of this region. An investment in Catamount is an investment in the NEK.


How Magic Mushrooms Work

Some historians believe that magic mushrooms may have been used as far back as 9000 B.C. in North African indigenous cultures, based on representations in rock paintings. Statues and other representatives of what appear to be mushrooms that have been found in Mayan and Aztec ruins in Central America. The Aztecs used a substance called teonanácatl, which means "flesh of the gods," that many believe was magic mushrooms. Along with peyote, morning glory seeds and other naturally occurring psychotropics, the mushrooms were used to induce a trance, produce visions and communicate with the gods. When Spanish Catholic missionary priests came to the New World in the 16th century, some of them wrote about the use of these psychotropic substances.

However, the idea that magic mushrooms have a long, holy history is highly controversial. Some believe that none of this evidence is definitive, and that people are seeing what they want to see in the ancient paintings, sculptures and manuscripts. There is confirmed use among several contemporary tribes of indigenous peoples in Central America, including the Mazatec, Mixtec, Nauhua and Zapatec.

Magic mushrooms began to be eaten by Westerners in the late 1950s. A mycologist (one who studies mushrooms) named R. Gordon Wasson was traveling through Mexico to study mushrooms in 1955. He witnessed and participated in a ritual ceremony using magic mushrooms. It was conducted by a shaman of the Mazatec, an indigenous people who live in the Oaxaca region of southern Mexico. Wasson wrote an article about his findings, which was published in Life magazine in 1957. An editor came up with the title "Seeking the Magic Mushroom" and the article is the source of the phrase, although Wasson didn't use it. One of Wasson's colleagues, Roger Heim, had enlisted the help of Albert Hofmann (the "father" of LSD), who isolated and extracted psilocybin and psilocin from the mushrooms Heim and Wasson brought back from Mexico [source: Harvard University].

Timothy Leary, perhaps the most famous proponent of psychotropic drugs such as LSD, read the Life article and was intrigued, and he began experimenting with them at Harvard University. From there, magic mushrooms became inextricably tied to the hippie movement and its search for a new form of spirituality for the rest of the decade. For years, mushrooms were mostly associated with the counterculture [source: Harvard University].

But these days, magical fungi are finding broader acceptance in popular culture. Some people have taken up what's called "microdosing" with psilocybin, essentially consuming tiny amounts of the chemical. They don't experience full-blown trips. Instead, they feel a boost in mood and creativity that they believe lowers their anxiety and makes them more productive. Some studies seem to support their claims [source: Garlick].

Scientists are now pursuing a number of avenues of research on these mysterious chemicals. The 1970s brought a ban on psilocybin except for medical research, which only recently began again after more than 30 years. In October 2018, the Food & Drug Administration granted Compass Pathways permission to research mushrooms as a treatment for depression. Researchers plan to combine intense therapy with psilocybin in hopes of finding better ways to combat treatment-resistant depression, which they say affects about 100 million people worldwide [source: Compass].

In September 2019, Johns Hopkins University unveiled its Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research. There, scientists plan to evaluate psilocybin as a possible treatment for everything from opioid addiction, Lyme disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, nicotine and alcohol dependency, and many other ailments.

There are many other researchers around the world digging into the possible medicinal uses of these magical chemicals. All of them seek to unlock the way magic mushrooms and their compounds interact with our brains and bodies. Perhaps their work will unlock the doors of perception in our minds in ways we can't yet even begin to imagine.


Catamount LSD-17 - History

Throughout our history of more than 20 years, Catamount has thrived on delivering successful projects through sustaining excellent performance, forming and maintaining lasting partnerships, and delivering lasting results. Every decision our teams make goes beyond single issues to focus on our client’s “big picture”. With that focus, not only does our client see the benefit of a long term relationship with Catamount, but our employees gain an opportunity to truly connect with their work, own their successes and their results.

Welcome to Catamount

We are a company of thinkers, doers, innovators, and owners. Our culture centers around a vision of shared success. We thrive on the satisfaction that comes with helping our clients through difficult challenges. In turn, we challenge ourselves to be more active in our own communities and we take the time to share our successes at work with those at home.


1955 – 1965 [ edit | edit source ]

On 3 January 1955, Catamount cleared for the Far East once again, arriving at Yokosuka 25 January. Almost at once she sailed for the Taiwan Straits to take part in the evacuation of the Tachen Islands early in February. She returned to San Diego 24 April. After local operations, she spent 16 January to 30 August 1956 in the central Pacific in Operation Redwing, a series of nuclear tests. In the summer of 1957, Catamount sailed from Seattle on resupply missions to stations of the Distant Early Warning Line (DEW Line) in the Arctic. From 12 June to 8 December 1958, she cruised in the Far East once more, returning for duty off the coast of southern California. Among her assignments was qualifying helicopter pilots in landings on ships of her type, and participating in amphibious landing exercises based on the relatively new concept of vertical envelopment. Special operations off the northwest coast of the United States and British Columbia in the spring and summer of 1959 preceded a deployment to Hawaii for amphibious training. Later in the year she was overhauled in Portland, Oreg., returning to operations from San Diego 25 March 1960. After a brief period of operations and supplementary overhaul in San Diego, Catamount sailed on 25 June on a special mission, carrying landing craft to southern Chile, devastated by the Great Chilean Earthquake. Transferred to the Chilean Navy, these landing craft provided critically needed transportation in regions where piers had been destroyed by tsunami. Catamount returned to San Diego on 13 August, operated on the west coast and on 22 November sailed for another tour with the U.S. 7th Fleet in the Far East.


Glen Frederick Gahring Collection

Type of Resource: Video: VHS [1 item] -- Oral history interview Manuscript: Civilian papers (certificates, forms, wills, etc) [1 item] -- Typewritten document Manuscript: Clippings [2 items] -- Typewritten document Manuscript: Correspondence [1 item] -- Typewritten document Manuscript: Memoirs [1 item] -- Handwritten document Manuscript: Military papers (orders, personnel/201 files, etc) [10 items] -- Typewritten document Photograph: Copy photographic print [11 items] -- Photographs Video: DVD [1 item] -- Reference copy Interviewer: Mary Evans Contributor: Mary Evans Contributor Affiliation/Organization: Herbert Hoover Presidential Library Collection #: AFC/2001/001/24465 Subjects: Gahring, Glen Frederick World War, 1939-1945--Personal Narratives United States. Navy. Korean War, 1950-1953--Personal Narratives Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Personal Narratives Cite as: Glen Frederick Gahring Collection
(AFC/2001/001/24465), Veterans History Project, American Folklife Center, Library of Congress


1955 – 1965

On 3 January 1955, Catamount cleared for the Far East once again, arriving at Yokosuka 25 January. Almost at once she sailed for the Taiwan Straits to take part in the evacuation of the Tachen Islands early in February. She returned to San Diego 24 April. After local operations, she spent 16 January to 30 August 1956 in the central Pacific in Operation Redwing, a series of nuclear tests. In the summer of 1957, Catamount sailed from Seattle on resupply missions to stations of the Distant Early Warning Line (DEW Line) in the Arctic.

From 12 June to 8 December 1958, she cruised in the Far East once more, returning for duty off the coast of southern California. Among her assignments was qualifying helicopter pilots in landings on ships of her type, and participating in amphibious landing exercises based on the relatively new concept of vertical envelopment. Special operations off the northwest coast of the United States and British Columbia in the spring and summer of 1959 preceded a deployment to Hawaii for amphibious training. Later in the year she was overhauled in Portland, Oreg., returning to operations from San Diego 25 March 1960.

After a brief period of operations and supplementary overhaul in San Diego, Catamount sailed on 25 June on a special mission, carrying landing craft to southern Chile, devastated by the Great Chilean Earthquake. Transferred to the Chilean Navy, these landing craft provided critically needed transportation in regions where piers had been destroyed by tsunami. Catamount returned to San Diego on 13 August, operated on the west coast and on 22 November sailed for another tour with the U.S. 7th Fleet in the Far East.


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